14 Oct 2013

TA47 – EASA Paris #3 Dan Rabinowitz

Posted by Norma Deseke. No Comments

This podcast provides an interview with Dr. Dan Rabinowitz from the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tel-Aviv University and was recorded by Norma Deseke at the 12th European Association of Social Anthropologists conference in Nanterre, Paris in July 2012.

We talked about EASA´s development, the recent protests in and changes of Israeli society and anthropology´s tradition in the region as well as the discipline´s challenges. Dan shared his experiences of how he came to be an anthropologist and provides some advice for students considering a PhD in anthropology.

Dan is interested in ethnicity and nationalism, environment and society, globalisation and transnationalism, identity, ethnography, housing and housing co-operatives, the Palestinian citizens of Israel, Palestinians, Islamic movements, Israeli society and Middle East Politics; Bedouins and places such as Nazareth and Sinai.

Further talks recorded at EASA provide interviews with Helena Wulff, Professor at the University of Stockholm and Prof. Henrietta L. Moore from Cambridge University. For more information about EASA please check our http://www.easaonline.org/.

18 Feb 2013

TA46 – EASA Paris #2 Helena Wulff

Posted by Norma Deseke. No Comments

This podcast provides an interview with Professor Helena Wulff from the University of Stockholm, Sweden and was recorded by Norma Deseke at the 12th European Association of Social Anthropologists conference in Nanterre, Paris in July 2012.

We talked about the meaning of the EASA conference theme “Uncertainty and Disquiet” and the tradition of anthropology in Sweden. Central to the talk is Helena´s approach to writing and she provides some advice to develop strategies and techniques for the improvement of one´s own texts. We touched on issues concerning the handling of critique and the tension between the creative potential of crisis and increased competition due to shrinking funding opportunities.

Helena Wulff´s research is in the anthropology of communication and aesthetics based on a wide range of studies on the social worlds of literary production, dance, and visual arts. Her specialist skills are in expressive cultural form (dance, art, images, and text) in a transnational perspective, visual culture, the emotions, and media as well as anthropological methods. Helena has held visiting professorships at the University of Ulster, the University of Vienna, the National University of Singapore, and the University of Illinois. Drawing on her research, she also occasionally writes popular articles for newspapers and magazines in Sweden and the UK.
Helena has conducted field studies in Stockholm, London, New York, Frankfurt-am-Main, and Ireland (mostly Dublin). Her current research is on writing and literature as cultural process and form focusing on contemporary Irish writers as cultural translators and public intellectuals.

Further talks recorded at the EASA conference provide interviews with Henrietta L. Moore, Professor at Cambridge University and Dan Rabinowitz from Tel Aviv University. For more information about EASA please check our http://www.easaonline.org/.

18 Jan 2013

TA45 – GDAT#1 neoliberalism

Posted by Thomas Lohninger. 1 Comment

This episode is another non regular one and comes from the University of Manchester Group for Debates in Anthropological Theory (GDAT). The motion to be debated is: The concept of neoliberalism has become an obstacle to the anthropological understanding of the twenty-first century.

The motion will be proposed by James Laidlaw (Cambridge) and Jonathan Mair (Cambridge and Manchester). It will be opposed by Thomas Hylland Eriksen (Oslo) and Keir Martin (Manchester).

THE IDEA
The Group for Debates in Anthropological Theory (GDAT) aims to generate stimulating discussions on anthropological theory through a debate format. The first debate was held in 1988 in Manchester, and the debates became an annual fixture after that. Following a break of 8 years between 1999 and 2007, the annual debate was revived in 2008 with financial support from Critique of Anthropology.
For those of you who have not attended previous debates, the format is as follows. A motion is proposed for debate. Two speakers argue for the motion and two against the motion. Each speaker is given 20 minutes. After a short break, everyone reassembles for questions and general discussion. Finally the motion is put to vote by a show of hands.

7 Dec 2012

TA44 – EASA Paris #1 Henrietta L. Moore

Posted by Norma Deseke. 1 Comment

This interview with Professor Henrietta L. Moore from the University of Cambridge is the first of three episodes that were produced by Norma Deseke at the 12th conference of the European Association of Social Anthropologists in Nanterre, Paris in July 2012. Further talks recorded at EASA provide interviews with Helena Wulff, Professor at the University of Stockholm and Dan Rabinowitz from Tel Aviv University. For more information about EASA please see the official website on http://www.easaonline.org/.

Professor Henrietta L. Moore talks about the meaning of the EASA conference theme “Uncertainty and Disquiet”, the tradition of the discipline in the UK and anthropology´s contemporary challenges. We touch on issues concerning the decline of funding, increasing protests and pressures of mobility as well as open access approaches, such as the HAU Journal of Ethnographic Theory (http://www.haujournal.org/index.php/hau). Professor Moore gives us her perspective on theoretical avenues pivotal to the discipline and her criteria for good anthropology and well-written ethnographies. She will also talk about the reasons for her long-term fascination for anthropology and give young anthropologists some advice for their academic career.

Henrietta L. Moore FBA is the William Wyse Chair of Social Anthropology at the University of Cambridge. She is one of the leading theorists of gender in the social sciences and her work has developed a distinctive approach to the analysis of the interrelations of material and symbolic gender systems, embodiment and performance, and identity and sexuality. She has worked extensively in Africa, particularly on gender, livelihood strategies, social transformation and symbolic systems. Recent research has focused on virtual worlds, new technologies and the relationship between self-imagining and globalisation. She is a Fellow of the British Academy, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and Academician of the Learned Societies for the Social Sciences. Her most recent book, Still Life: Hopes, Desires and Satisfactions (2011), argues for a reconsideration of globalisation based on ordinary people’s capacities for self–making and social transformation.

Please see Professor Moore´s website on http://www.henriettalmoore.com.

 

Next Page »